1966 Triumph TR4A Surrey Top

Posted by admin September - 16 - 2014 - Tuesday ADD COMMENTS

1966 Triumph TR4A Surrey Top Wire Wheel OverdriveIn our shop undergoing a complete cosmetic and mechanical restoration is this 1966 Triumph TR4A. Equipped with Surrey Top, Wire Wheels and Overdrive Transmission this will be a very desirable sports car. Look for a completion date of Spring 2015!

We found this highly optioned TR4A languishing in a suburban St. Louis garage in July of 2013 where it had been resting for over 20 years. After a deal was struck with the previous owner we began our standard British Sports Car 4 Step revival process: STEP 1: Get it Running STEP 2: Restore and detail the engine bay STEP 3: Repair everything that needs repair and STEP 4: Find a new happy owner.

STEP 1 went exactly as expected, new battery, rebuilt starter, 4 new spark plugs, oil change with filter, sanded the points, cleaned the carbs, and added some fresh fuel in the float bowls and PRESTO… a good running No Smoke vintage Triumph engine with good oil pressure. SO FAR SO GOOD…

STEP 2 was where our game plan radically changed. As we were dismantling the engine bay to freshen up the bright red paint we noticed that the lower radiator hose and radiator were full of stop leak. When we removed the water pump our fears were confirmed, in an effort to fix a leaking radiator the previous owner over filled the cooling system with stop leak. At this point we were afraid to proceed with out plan for fear of creating a Hot Running sports car and a very unhappy new owner.

THE NEW GAME PLAN: With a block full of stop leak we decided to take the much longer and more expensive route of rebuilding the engine and everything else as well. In September 2013 be began the journey. We removed the engine and transmission, and we gutted the interior as well. My partner took the “roller” home to work on some chassis issues while I started on the engine teardown. As suspected, the block was full of stop leak… now standing at the top of the “Slippery Slope” of automotive rebuild I ordered everything pictured here:  Pistons, Liners, Rings, Bearings, Gasket Sets, Freeze Plugs, and other various engine pieces.

TR4A Engine Rebuild Parts Pistons Liners Gaskets

While I was on a roll I sent the radiator and the heater core out to be hot tanked, pressure checked and repaired.

Triumph TR4A Radiator and Heater Core ready to install

SEPTEMBER 2013 – JANUARY 2014

With the engine torn down, we sent the block, crankshaft, rods, and cylinder head out to the local machine shop to reconditioned. Surprisingly, my partner and a friend pulled the body off of the chassis to make chassis repairs easier. While he was fixing things, the frame was sanded and received a fresh coat of black paint. Front and rear brakes were rebuilt, suspension bushings were replaced, all new brake lines were installed and rear shocks were reconditioned. We ordered a new body mounting kit and our TR4A returned to my shop in one piece as seen below. We scuffed and degreased the engine bay and added a fresh coat of paint to the engine bay. Let the rebuild begin.

In addition, my partner had the original wire wheels media blasted and powder coated a nice stock looking shade of gray. Note the chassis details in the wheel well.

1966 Triumph TR4A Rear Wheel Arch Hub and Chassis Detail

1966 Triumph TR4A Powder Coated Wire Wheel

FEBRUARY – JUNE 2014

While waiting for the machine shop to finish our engine pieces, we removed, cleaned, and painted the fuel tank and reconditioned the fuel sending unit as well as checked the fuel gauge for functionality. With the fuel tank reinstalled, we next reconditioned the exhaust system which appeared to have been installed new just before the car was placed into storage. The exhaust manifold was coated with ceramic coating and new studs and brass nuts installed. We ordered most the new interior pieces that we need. We removed the windshield housing and replaced the weatherstripping. With the windshield removed, we reconditioned the perfect dash pad. We also replaced the bright weatherstrip trim on windshield and rear window.

JULY – SEPTEMBER

We finally received the reconditioned block, crankshaft, rods, and cylinder head from the machine shop and engine assembly began. We also cleaned, and checked the operation of the overdrive transmission and found it in good operating order.

Triumph TR4A Reconditioned Cylinder Head Ready for Installation

Reconditioned Triumph TR4A Cylinder Head with valves installed

Triumph TR4A assembled lower end ready for oil pan

Triumph TR4A rebuilt engine oil pan installed

OCTOBER – DECEMBER 2014

The freshly rebuilt engine was reunited with the Overdrive transmission. We reinstalled the clutch and pressure plate which appeared to have been installed new just before the car was put into storage. The engine and gearbox were installed in the car. The previously removed pedal assembly was reconditioned and reinstalled in the car. Both master cylinders were rebuilt as well as the clutch slave cylinder. The clutch master cylinder was filled with hydraulic fluid, bled, and declared operational. We also removed both doors, cleaned up and re-sprayed both door jams with a fresh coat of bright red color. While we were at it we sprayed the inner door panels as well. Next the inner and outer window seals were replaced. Since we had color matched red paint in the gun, we touched up the rock chips and scuff marks on both rocker panels. This vintage sports car is really starting to take shape.

IT”S ALIVE!

On February 8 our TR4A came to life after 30+ years of hibernation. After installing the rebuilt and polished SU carburetors and throttle linkage, we reconnected the electrical system and installed the distributor and distributor base.

1965 Triumph TR4A Engine Fresh Rebuild

We then filled the crankcase with oil and added a fresh filter. We connected the battery and turned the engine over confirming that we had good oil pressure. We also removed the valve cover and confirmed that we had sufficient oiling of the rocker and valve assembly. Next, we confirmed that we had spark at the plugs. Finally, we manually filled the SU float bowls with gasoline and crossed our fingers. With the choke applied, we turned the key and with a twist of the distributor the big two liter roared to like. We let it run long enough to, once again, confirm oil pressure and check for any unusual noises… there were none.  I love the smell of freshly curing engine and header paint… out TR4A is alive.

 

1975 Porsche 914 2.0

Posted by admin September - 15 - 2014 - Monday ADD COMMENTS

1975 Porsche 914 2.0The latest project to arrive at the Flashback Racing garage is this 1975 Porsche 914 2.0. The previous owner had finally given up on trying to make the repairs that this mid engine German roadster needed. We found it happily running along on 3 cylinders with little or no compression in the fourth chamber. Time for a complete mechanical rebuild. While we are into the car that far we will add a fresh coat of paint and look to have a road ready 914 in the spring of 2015. Here is how the project is coming along:

June 21: We acquired the Porsche and took the following photographs.

June 28: The dismantling process begins. We pulled the engine and transaxle and removed all the engine tin and exhaust system.

914 2.0 engine transaxle and exhaust

Here is the 2.0 engine, transaxle and exhaust as it appeared upon removal from the car. The only issue we observed was a massive use of silicone sealant on and around the pushrod tubes in an attempt to stop or slow down oil leaks. We next separated the engine, transaxle and exhaust system and removed all of the engine shrouding placing the engine on an engine stand for complete disassembly.

In the weeks that followed our engine teardown revealed no major issues with this engine.

Cylinder heads appeared to have been recently rebuilt.

Pistons and liners also seemed to be rather new. In fact it appeared that the non firing piston and cylinder had never been up to operating temperature.

September 12-13

We complete the tear down of our 2.0 Porsche 914 engine. Here are the engine case halves cleaned, detailed and ready for reassembly. The crankshaft mic’ed out fine and the bearings all looked good. This engine had almost no wear on the previous rebuild.

Porsche 2.0 engine case halves cleaned for assembly

We also cleaned and polished all the other engine components prior to starting the rebuild.

We then ordered new pistons and liners, gasket set, intake and carb set, and sent the cylinder heads to our favorite machine shop to be checked for cracks and valve seating. The rebuild process will begin shortly.

As I get closer to the completion of the rebuild of our Depression Era Big Car project, I wanted to post a brief video of this car starting and running with out the engine side panels and hood. It was January 1, 2012 and what better way to celebrate the new year than listening to four big flathead pistons firing through a four inch open exhaust. What a great sound! I plan to offer this vintage race car for sale in just a few days.

The 39 car was quickly sold in February 2012 to a delighted Ford dealership in New York City where it served as a show room attraction.

The 39 car has recently resurfaced in March 2013 in the hands of an avid collector in the state of Illinois.

Reassembly Continues on Vintage Ford Big Car

Posted by admin December - 26 - 2011 - Monday ADD COMMENTS

Reassembly continues on our 1938 Depression Era Big Car. The aluminum belly pan was nicked and scratched from dirt clod and stone strikes during exhibition racing events. The belly ban was refinished and given a fresh coat of silver paint.

The freshly painted belly pan and cowl assembly were installed today. The cowl and tail assembly were then clay barred, cleaned and waxed to remove any traces of shop dirt and grit which may have accumulated on the painted surfaces during the time the cart was disassembled. This vintage race car is coming together nicely and the craftsmanship of the car’s builder is very apparent.

This photo detailing the decals on the cowl indicate that this car was affiliated with the Antique Auto Racing Association and the Midwest Old Timers Vintage Race Car Club. The car has appeared in events sanctioned by both associations.

This car is equipped with period correct outside rear brake lever and manual fuel pressure air pump. Because of the on board battery and starter this race car is equipped with a kill switch on the driver side frame rail. Due to the fact that these race cars relied on air pressure to force the fuel forward to the carburetor the fuel cap is a sealed vent-less unit.

I am happy to report that the long awaited return of our Ford Model B race engine to our Depression Era Big Car is now complete. The engine is installed and running great. The new engine carries great oil pressure, consistent compression of 115-120psi. and no sign of any coolant leaks. We plan to do a bit of additional tuning and then add the cowling back on the car. As you can see from the following images, this car carries an on-board battery, starter, and mini alternator to make getting the car to and from events easy.

I have also included a close up photo of the Ford factory replacement block Diamond Casting mark on the engine block.

Because most of the car’s internal features are visible at this time, I have added photos of the vintage 1928 Franklin steering components, front and rear suspension detail, and on-board battery box.

Restored 1928 Franklin Steering

Vintage Ford Rear Axle note Safety Wire

On-Board Battery System

Front Suspension and Steering Detail

Vintage Ford Model B race engine returns from builder.

Posted by admin December - 4 - 2011 - Sunday ADD COMMENTS

Flashback racing recently took delivery on our freshly rebuilt Ford Model B engine for our vintage depression era Big Car. When our previous engine developed a frost crack and began weeping coolant we knew it was time for a rebuild. A historical note here is that Freeze Plugs for water cooled engines had not been invented yet. After tearing down our engine and having the block repaired, we were able to acquire a vintage factory replacement Model B block which can be identified by the small diamond casting on the front of the block. These blocks are stronger than the original factory castings and the best choice for any high performance applications.

Our rebuilt engine features new pistons, wrist pins, rings, bearings, seals, and gaskets. Our previous valve train, crankshaft and connecting rods was near perfect, they were cleaned up and reinstalled. These images came with the engine and the invoice.

Freshly bored Model B block ready for pistons


TR7 V8 Race Coupe returns from Paint Shop

Posted by admin March - 20 - 2010 - Saturday ADD COMMENTS

My TR7 V8 Race Coupe returned from the painter this morning. This project has been a budget build from the beginning. In order to save money on this build, paint work was limited to the engine bay, the front nose, fiberglass hood and deck lid as well as the driverside  front and rear wheel arches below the body stripe. The single stage blue enamel was color matched to the existing factory color.

1977 Volkswagen Super Beetle Convertible

Posted by admin February - 10 - 2010 - Wednesday ADD COMMENTS

I am selling this Very Nice 1977 Super Beetle Convertible for a friend who purchased this Classic VW in 1997 and was the third owner of the car. During that time, the car received a same color re-spray to freshen up it’s appearance. My friend drove this car only occasionally over the last dozen years, it spent the majority of its time parked in his garage. The car has 58,801 original miles and the car is mechanically stock and unaltered. The cream color paint job is very nice and there is no evidence of rust problems. I checked the floorboards and rockers (from above) and found them all to be solid.  The car runs and drives nicely. It drips a bit of oil when parked (they all do). The convertible top is in nice condition, the only flaw being a 1″ tear on the passenger side.  There are also some special extras included with this car. The owner says $7,500 takes it.

New Arrival 1984 Z28 Camaro 60,000 Miles

Posted by admin February - 10 - 2010 - Wednesday ADD COMMENTS

In early November 2009, I closed a deal on this 1984 Z28 Camaro. The funds from the sale of my 1967 Volkswagen Beetle were burning a hole in my pocket and this 60,000 mile Camaro was available. Leaving at 6:00am I made the 350+ mile trip to Richmond, Indiana and picked up the car. This Z28 is finished in black with stock light tan and black interior. The engine is a very tame and very stock 305ci V8 with a 700R4 transmission. (think 383 stroker and Power Glide here) This vehicle is not show quality but cleans up nice, it looks great from 6 feet away.  This vehicle is currently inspected and licensed… and because it is over 25 years old, it no longer needs to pass emission testing (at least in Missouri). Stop me know before I buy a crate motor… I’ve already got the Power Glide. $5,000

1951 Crosley Super Sedan Barn Find

Posted by admin January - 6 - 2010 - Wednesday ADD COMMENTS
1951 Crosley Sedan

1951 Crosley Super Sedan For Sale

A recent departure from  my inventory is this Barn Find 1951 Crosley Super Sedan. This car literally came from a collection of antique automobiles stored in a Dairy Barn. The registration on the windshield is from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1972. Side window decals show the state of Maine and the State of Florida! Both challenging trips in a 44 cubic inch mini sedan. The odometer read 31,233. This car was a unmolested original with one blue color change paint coat over the original green color. The new owners seemed happy with their new project.

 

Get Adobe Flash playerPlugin by wpburn.com wordpress themes